Jesus Miracles

You are currently browsing articles tagged Jesus Miracles.

Phenomenon [fɪˈnɒmɪnən]

n pl -ena [-ɪnə], -enons

1. anything that can be perceived as an occurrence or fact by the senses

2. any remarkable occurrence or person

3. (Philosophy) Philosophy

a.  the object of perception, experience, etc.

b.  (in the writings of Kant) a thing as it appears and is interpreted in perception and reflection, as distinguished from its real nature as a thing-in-itself Compare noumenon

[via Late Latin from Greek phainomenon, from phainesthai to appear, from phainein to show]

Usage: Although phenomena is often treated as if it were singular, correct usage is to employ phenomenon with a singular construction and phenomena with a plural: that is an interesting phenomenon (not phenomena); several new phenomena were recorded in his notes

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

 Miracles

Historical events or natural phenomena that appear to violate natural laws but that reveal God to the eye of faith at the same time. A valuable way of understanding the meaning of miracles is to examine the various terms for miracles used in the Bible.

Both the Old Testament and the New Testament use the word sign (Is. 7:11, 14; John 2:11) to denote a miracle that points to a deeper revelation. Wonder (Joel 2:30; Mark 13:22) emphasizes the effect of the miracle, causing awe and even terror. A work (Matt. 11:2) points to the presence of God in history, acting for mankind. The New Testament uses the word power (Mark 6:7) to emphasize God’s acting in strength. These terms often overlap in meaning (Acts 2:43). They are more specific than the more general term miracle.

Miracles in the Old Testament are connected especially with the great events in Israel’s history-the call of Abraham (Gen. 12:1-3), the birth of Moses (Ex. 1:1-2:22), the Exodus from Egypt (Ex. 12:1-14:31), the giving of the law (Ex 19:1-20:26), the entry into the Promised Land (Josh. 3:1-4:7), etc. these miracles are for salvation, but God also acts in history for judgment (Gen. 11:1-9).

The plagues of the Exodus showed God’s sovereign power in judgment and salvation (Ex. 7:3-5). In parting the water, God showed His love and protection for Israel as well as His judgment on Egypt for its failure to recognize God (Ex. 15:2, 4-10). During the wilderness journey, God demonstrated, His love and protection in supplying the daily Manna (Ex. 16:1-36). Another critical period in Israel’s history was the time of Elijah, the champion of Israel. Elijah controlled the rain and successfully challenged the pagan priests of Baal (1 kin. 17:1; 18:1-40). God revealed Himself as Lord, as Savior of Israel, and as punisher of the nation’s enemies.

As with the Old Testament, the New Testament miracles are essentially expressions of God’s salvation and Glory. Why did Jesus perform miracles? Jesus answered this question Himself. When in Prison, John the Baptist sent some of his disciples to Jesus to see if He was the “one to come” (Matt. 11:3). Jesus told them to inform John of what He had done: “The blind receive sight, the lame walk, those who have leprosy are cured, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the good news is preached to the poor” (11:5).

With these words, Jesus declared that His miracles were the fulfillment of the promises of the Messiah’s kingdom as foretold by Isaiah (24:18-19; 35:5-6; 61:1). Jesus’ miracles were signs of the presence of the kingdom of God (Matt. 12:39).

Jesus did not work miracles to prove His deity or His messiahship. In fact, He clearly refused to work miracles as proofs (Matt. 12:38-42; Luke 11:29-32). His death was the proof to Israel. However, Jesus’ miracles do give evidence that He is divine, that He was the Son of God, the Messiah.

The Acts of the Apostles is a book of miracles. Again these miracles are a continuation of the miracles of Jesus, made possible through the Holy Spirit. The miracles of the Apostles were done in the name of Jesus and were manifestations of God’s salvation (Acts 3:11). This thread of continuity is seen in Peter’s miracles, which paralleled those of Jesus (Luke 7:22; 5:18-26; 8:19-56; Acts 3:1-16; 9:32-35 36-42).

God began His church with a powerful display of miracles. At Pentecost, the Holy Spirit came on the People with great power (Acts 2:1-13), leading to conversions (Acts 2:41). When Philip went to Samaria, the Spirit of God anointed him with power (Acts 8:4-40), and the same happened with Peter and Cornelius (Acts 10:1-48). These powerful wonders were designed to convince the apostles and the Palestinian church that other cultures were to be a part of the church.

To these were added the stunning act of God through Peter when Ananias and Sapphira acted in hypocrisy (Acts 4:32-5:11), the church’s power in prayer (Act’s 4: 23-31), and Paul’s transforming vision (Acts 16-6-10).

Miraculous powers were also present in the apostles. Peter healed a lame man (Acts 3:1-6), a paralytic (Acts 9:32-35), and raised the dead (Acts 9:36-42). The apostles performed mighty miracles (Acts 5:12-16), and Peter was miraculously released from prison (Acts 12:1-11). Paul’s conversion was a startling incident (Acts 9:1-19). Ability to work miracles was taken as a sign for apostleship by Paul (Rom. 15: 18-19; 2 Cor. 12:12). Thus, this ability to work miracles is not an expression of God’s salvation but also God’s way of authenticating His apostles.

The lists of the gifts of the Spirit in the New Testament show that miracles were one of the means by which believers ministered to others (Rom. 12:6-8; 1 Cor. 12:8-10, 28-30; Eph. 4:11-12).

Compact Bible Dictionary

Ronald F. Youngblood

F.F. Bruce

R.K. Harrison

Jesus Christ; is the true phenomena; He is the true Miracle. (The Trinity).

We have dreams. It is so evident to me that dreams do live on.

I am reminded of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for one.

How many of us; are the results of our parents and grandparents dreams and prayers?

At times; things may have a small beginning;

Zechariah 4:10: For who hath despised the day of small things?  for they shall rejoice, and shall see the plummet in the hand of Zerubbabel with those seven; they are the eyes of the LORD, which run to and fro through the whole earth.

When we began at the bottom; the only place to go is up.

Keeping in mind; always be patient;

Luke 21:19: In your patience possess ye your souls.

(Which; is very important!)

We must keep in contact/touch with our guide.

There are times; we may need another touch.

We must take the time to acknowledge, recognize and to appreciate Him.

Move as He instructs.

Be still; as He instructs.

Be obedient!

We must be obedient in the small things; as well as the big things.

It is important to go through our test/trials remembering; that we have a hope.

Someone said to me once; that I could complain; if I wanted to,

I declined; I believe God and I am standing on that.

When; I complain; my mouth ruins; everything that; I know!

My flesh starts to speak; not my spirit.

As I; was told as a child.

If you can’t say anything nice; don’t say anything at all.

Get back on track Barbara! (Smile)

Remember; if I can see it in the natural; this is a temporary situation.

2 Chronicles 25:9: And Amaziah said to the man of God, But what shall we do for the hundred talents which I have given to the army of Israel?  And the man of God answered, The LORD is able to give thee much more than this.

Or;

Ephesians 3:20: Now unto him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us,

At the point; when I complain; I’ve gotten out of the Spirit.

Galatians 5:22: But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith,

Galatians 5:23: Meekness, temperance: against such there is no law.

I do not find; back-biting, and complaining or not found among this list.

Thank you Lord.

So; I hold on to my peace; I do not give up emotionally or spiritually.

I have been a quiet person most of my life; it is my nature to be quiet.

I can blend into the wood work.

Which; is not always a good thing.

I ask the Lord to lead me and guide me.

This too shall pass.

We have options.

Normally; I would like to choose the quickest most convenient way to reach me desired end.

I have realized; with the Lord;

There are no short-cuts.

There are no substitutes.

Convenience is not a choice.

Obedience is the only choice.

Note: When I get into my flesh; I change/cancel my original confessions!

1 Corinthians 15:58: Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.

Note: I challenge; you to wait on the Lord and see what He has for you!

Tags: , , , , , ,

Miracles

Historical events or natural phenomena that appear to violate natural laws but that reveal God to the eye of faith at the same time. A valuable way of understanding the meaning of miracles is to examine the various terms for miracles used in the Bible.

Both the Old Testament and the New Testament use the word sign (Is. 7:11, 14; John 2:11) to denote a miracle that points to a deeper revelation. Wonder (Joel 2:30; Mark 13:22) emphasizes the effect of the miracle, causing awe and even terror. A work (Matt. 11:2) points to the presence of God in history, acting for mankind. The New Testament uses the word power (Mark 6:7) to emphasize God’s acting in strength. These terms often overlap in meaning (Acts 2:43). They are more specific than the more general term miracle.

Miracles in the Old Testament are connected especially with the great events in Israel’s history-the call of Abraham (Gen. 12:1-3), the birth of Moses (Ex. 1:1-2:22), the Exodus from Egypt (Ex. 12:1-14:31), the giving of the law (Ex 19:1-20:26), the entry into the Promised Land (Josh. 3:1-4:7), etc. these miracles are for salvation, but God also acts in history for judgment (Gen. 11:1-9).

The plagues of the Exodus showed God’s sovereign power in judgment and salvation (Ex. 7:3-5). In parting the water, God showed His love and protection for Israel as well as His judgment on Egypt for its failure to recognize God (Ex. 15:2, 4-10). During the wilderness journey, God demonstrated, His love and protection in supplying the daily Manna (Ex. 16:1-36). Another critical period in Israel’s history was the time of Elijah, the champion of Israel. Elijah controlled the rain and successfully challenged the pagan priests of Baal (1 kin. 17:1; 18:1-40). God revealed Himself as Lord, as Savior of Israel, and as punisher of the nation’s enemies.

As with the Old Testament, the New Testament miracles are essentially expressions of God’s salvation and Glory. Why did Jesus perform miracles? Jesus answered this question Himself. When in Prison, John the Baptist sent some of his disciples to Jesus to see if He was the “one to come” (Matt. 11:3). Jesus told them to inform John of what He had done: “The blind receive sight, the lame walk, those who have leprosy are cured, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the good news is preached to the poor” (11:5).

With these words, Jesus declared that His miracles were the fulfillment of the promises of the Messiah’s kingdom as foretold by Isaiah (24:18-19; 35:5-6; 61:1). Jesus’ miracles were signs of the presence of the kingdom of God (Matt. 12:39).

Jesus did not work miracles to prove His deity or His messiahship. In fact, He clearly refused to work miracles as proofs (Matt. 12:38-42; Luke 11:29-32). His death was the proof to Israel. However, Jesus’ miracles do give evidence that He is divine, that He was the Son of God, the Messiah.

The Acts of the Apostles is a book of miracles. Again these miracles are a continuation of the miracles of Jesus, made possible through the Holy Spirit. The miracles of the Apostles were done in the name of Jesus and were manifestations of God’s salvation (Acts 3:11). This thread of continuity is seen in Peter’s miracles, which paralleled those of Jesus (Luke 7:22; 5:18-26; 8:19-56; Acts 3:1-16; 9:32-35 36-42).

God began His church with a powerful display of miracles. At Pentecost, the Holy Spirit came on the People with great power (Acts 2:1-13), leading to conversions (Acts 2:41). When Philip went to Samaria, the Spirit of God anointed him with power (Acts 8:4-40), and the same happened with Peter and Cornelius (Acts 10:1-48). These powerful wonders were designed to convince the apostles and the Palestinian church that other cultures were to be a part of the church.

To these were added the stunning act of God through Peter when Ananias and Sapphira acted in hypocrisy (Acts 4:32-5:11), the church’s power in prayer (Act’s 4: 23-31), and Paul’s transforming vision (Acts 16-6-10).

Miraculous powers were also present in the apostles. Peter healed a lame man (Acts 3:1-6), a paralytic (Acts 9:32-35), and raised the dead (Acts 9:36-42). The apostles performed mighty miracles (Acts 5:12-16), and Peter was miraculously released from prison (Acts 12:1-11). Paul’s conversion was a startling incident (Acts 9:1-19). Ability to work miracles was taken as a sign for apostleship by Paul (Rom. 15: 18-19; 2 Cor. 12:12). Thus, this ability to work miracles is not an expression of God’s salvation but also God’s way of authenticating His apostles.

The lists of the gifts of the Spirit in the New Testament show that miracles were one of the means by which believers ministered to others (Rom. 12:6-8; 1 Cor. 12:8-10, 28-30; Eph. 4:11-12).

Compact Bible Dictionary

Ronald F. Youngblood

F.F. Bruce

R.K. Harrison

From Barbara Note: First of all;

Zechariah 4:6: Then he answered and spake unto me, saying, This is the word of the LORD unto Zerubbabel, saying, Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, saith the LORD of hosts.

That’s scripture.

Secondly; did you notice; that there are a lot of Ministers; that there titles are Apostle?

Does that mean that they have performed miracles?

Does this mean; that God has spoken to them directly?

I really don’t know. I don’t believe that we can or should judge what God has spoken to anyone!

James 1:17: Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning.

Matthew 7:20: Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them.

John 10:27: My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me:

Extra Note: I believe; that it is crucial; to recognize; God and His people!

 

Tags: ,